July, 2018

A new public school building opened in Mittagong in 1878: HIGHLANDS HISTORY

AT SCHOOL: Girls attending Mittagong Public School in its early years. ADDED ROOM: A timber infants’ classroom was in use from early 1900s at Mittagong Public School.
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LEFT: SOLID STONE: Although not a school since 1937, the building still remains much the same as in 1900. Photos: BDH&FHS

Part Two of a 3-part series

IN October 1878 a new public school opened in Queen St at New Sheffield, now Mittagong.

It was built to replace an earlier public school established in 1865 at the rear of the Wesleyan Church in Albert St, on land provided by the directors of the Fitzroy Ironworks Company.

The new public school was a shingle-roofed, solid stone structure that consisted of a single classroom and adjoining teacher’s residence, built by Charles Grove of Bowral whose tender was accepted by the Education Board in August 1877. The building was erected in the New Sheffield sub-division on a one-acre plot purchased from the Fitzroy Bessemer Steel Hematite Iron and Coal Company Limited

It was stipulated by the Education Board that it be of stone rather than brick, as the bricks produced in the area at the time were considered to be of inferior quality. As well as erecting numerous houses in the area, the builder Grove was later successful, in 1886, in his tender to build St Simon and St Jude’s Church of England and accompanying schoolroom in Bowral.

According to a local resident, who in his early years attended the public school in Mittagong, the stones for the building came from the local Gibbergunyah Quarry, situated at the south western edge of the town. It has long since been filled in, being used many years ago as the local garbage tip. Several houses in the town were also built of stone from this quarry.

THE school opened in October 1878. It had an initial capacity of 70 pupils but, after a few years, the single classroom did not provide enough room for rapidly increasing enrolments.

In February 1880 the name of the school was changed from New Sheffield to Mittagong Public School. By then the name Mittagong, given to the railway station that opened in 1867, had been officially adopted for the expanding township.

In February 1881 a new room, to be for an infants’ class, was added as an extension to the western side of the building. At this stage the number of pupils attending the school had risen to 160, in the care of a principal teacher and two pupil teachers.

Over following years, as enrolments continued to rise, further extensions were made. In 1887 a large classroom was built at the western end of the earlier addition and extending southward to create an ‘L’ shape. This became the new infants’ room and two years later it held more than 100 infant pupils with a mistress and two assistants.

In 1888 extensions were made to the residence, providing an extra room and bathroom on the northern side. Yet another school room was added in 1897, in line with the main body of the building and extending further westward.

All these extensions were carried out using stone from the same quarry, and a uniform style was applied for all the windows and finishings. Thus the extended building appears as if it had been built all at once. It is also of architectural interest that the windows reveal two different techniques – casement and double-hung.

By the early 1900s, as Mittagong’s population continued to increase, further classroom capacity was required at the school. To serve as a new infants’ classroom, a substantial timber structure was either built or moved onto the site, positioned a short distance from the southwest edge of the existing building.

Despite this, the Department of Education considered that the school would not meet expected future enrolments, so it purchased an eight-acre block of land in Pioneer St for a new public school. At this new site, on a corner block, a head teacher’s residence was built in 1917 by Alf Stephens & Sons, prominent Bowral builders.

The solid stone walls and roof section of the existing residence in Queen St were dismantled from the original building and removed. Irregular stonework can be seen on the north-facing wall of the existing building, revealing where the residence was detached. The stones over the remainder of the building are all of a regular size and shape. A stone plinth in the grounds of the building, now Mittagong Library, indicates where the residence once stood.

It had been intended to build a new public school on the purchased site in Pioneer St but, owing to a lack of funds, this did not eventuate until November 1937 when a new two-storey building was opened.

Until then, the existing building in Queen St, with extensive alterations carried out in 1924, remained in use as Mittagong Public School.

To be continued

This article compiled by PHILIP MORTON is sourced from the archives of Berrima District Historical & Family History Society, Bowral Rd, Mittagong. Phone 4872 2169.

Email [email protected]南京夜网.

Web: berrimadistricthistoricalsociety.org.au

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BDAS Sculpture Prize exhibition: PHOTOS

BDAS Sculpture Prize exhibition: PHOTOS Freya Jobbins ‘ “The Collective” features pieces made from the hands of dolls. Photo by Victoria Lee
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‘Coinslot Memory’ by Fiona Edmeades won first prize in the 2015 BDAS Bowral Sculpture Prize. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Coinslot Memory’ by Fiona Edmeades won first prize in the 2015 BDAS Bowral Sculpture Prize. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Lady Grand’ by Cathie Alexander utilises teak, stainless steel and perspex. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Lady Grand’ by Cathie Alexander utilises teak, stainless steel and perspex. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Triple Caval’ by Norma Hamilton uses Raku clay and fired sawdust. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Mr Happy Thoughts’ by Libby Hobbs is a ceramic piece with a lot of personality. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘The Royal Couple’ is a clay work by Johanne Santry. Photo by Victoria Lee

There are many creative and intriguing works on display at BDAS Gallery. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Imprint’ by Anne Kwasner is made from ceramic and oxides. The handbuilt ceramic feet are mythical representations. Photo by Victoria Lee

Freya Jobbins ‘ “The Collective” features pieces made from the hands of dolls. Photo by Victoria Lee

Freya Jobbins ‘ “The Collective” features pieces made from the hands of dolls. Photo by Victoria Lee

Freya Jobbins ‘ “The Collective” features pieces made from the hands of dolls. Photo by Victoria Lee

Freya Jobbins ‘ “The Collective” features pieces made from the hands of dolls. Photo by Victoria Lee

There are many creative and intriguing works on display at BDAS Gallery. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Flight Plan’ by Gary Smith used wood and feathers to create a piece with a lot of movement. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Flight Plan’ by Gary Smith used wood and feathers to create a piece with a lot of movement. Photo by Victoria Lee

Kathy Golab, Jenny Coleman and Jan Nicholls from the Southern Highland Textiles and Fibre Network came to have a look at the exhibition at BDAS. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Touching Ground’ by Mike MacGregor features steel and bronze and received a highly commended. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Family’ by Paul Dimmer uses clean, simple lines made from corten steel, stainless steel and copper. Photo by Victoria Lee

Beth Crawford’s ‘Egg and Nest II’ features a painted ceramic egg on a bed of palm leaves. Photo by Victoria Lee

Michael Pfahl’s ‘Harpish’ is an indoor piece that was too large to move inside the gallery. The piece has a musical component and can be strummed. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Childhood Companions’ by Britta Stenmanns uses recycled hardwood with a steel base.

‘Childhood Companions’ by Britta Stenmanns uses recycled hardwood with a steel base.

‘Childhood Companions’ by Britta Stenmanns uses recycled hardwood with a steel base.

‘Owl’ by Arenaria is made from sandstone and makes use of the natural colouring of the sandstone. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Loggerheads’ by Ellen Brien-Boerma, made from a Jacaranda branch. Photo by Victoria Lee

Sandstone and copper ‘Pear’ by Arenaria. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Out and About’ by Heidi McGeoch. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Lady Maple’ by Zoe Young. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Oh Well’ by Johanne Santry. Photo by Victoria Lee

‘Professor Ein Stein’ by Carol Willis is made from silver, silver plate, crystal and gilt metal. Photo by Victoria Lee

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Growth in city driven by jobs

Wagga Business Chamber president James Howell
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​WAGGA is primed for sustained economic growth across the board, according to council’s latest snapshot of the sector.

Wagga City Council’s 2015 economic snapshot highlights the city’s low unemployment rate and cheap property prices and forecasts its population to grow by around 17,000 over the next two decades.

Unemployment in Wagga is currently at 4.9 per cent, below both the state average of 5.9 per cent and the national level of 6.4 per cent.

Business Chamber president James Howell said the unemployment levels painted a rosy picture for Wagga locals and may be a key driver in the forecast growth.

“(Low unemployment) makes it tricky for employers to source candidates as well,” he said.

“Hopefully with the expanding economy and more people moving to the region, you’ll see more growth in businesses.”

Council’s director of commercial and economic development Peter Adams agreed the strength of Wagga’s job market was likely to attract more residents to the city over the coming years.

Dr Adams highlighted the diversity of the city’s economy, which he likened to a superannuation fund, as a key driver in continued sustainable growth.

“Oiur strength has always been the diversity of the economy,” he said.

“While it’s nice for places to have the mining booms, eventually they bust.”

One key point highlighted by this year’s snapshot is the comparative affordability of industrial land compared to Sydney.

The snapshot states two hectares of industrial land in Bomencosts about one-sixth of the equivalent sized block in Wetherill Park, in Sydney’s west, based on 2012 sale prices.

But according to Mr Howell, the proliferation of cheaply available industrial land needs to be matched by more residential land being made available.

“To keep up with the amount of forecasted people moving to town, we’d like to see (development application approvals) increasing in the residential sector as well,” he said.

“If you have a shortage of land, that’s going to make the cost of living significantly higher in Wagga.”

Mr Howell said the availability of industrial land also needed to be paired with a marketing drive to ensure the city takes full advantage.

“I haven’t seen in marketing in business circles the lower cost of acquiring land in Wagga,” he said.

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Telstra jobs to go by April 14

Telstra area general manager Bill Mundy announcing the job cuts in February. PICTURE: JEREMY BANNISTER D-DAY is looming for almost 80 local Telstra employees who will be axed early next month.
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Telstra, whichannounced in February that 78 “back room” jobs at their Gillies Street office would go, have revealed the date as April 14.

But the organisation couldn’t provide the exact job loss figure, with a spokesman saying factors such as voluntary redundancy and redeployment within Telstra meant the figure could be significantly less.

There are 128 Telstra employees in Ballarat.

Telstra area general manager Bill Mundy said in February that the cuts would affect 64 local employees before he revised the figure to include 28 full-time Telstra staff and 50 agency or consultancy staff, a total of 78.

Mr Mundy said the reason for the cuts was productivity-related and aimed at reducing duplication in the organisation.

“We will work as hard as possible to find other roles within the business – and for those who wish to exit the business, we will work with them as they depart as well,” he said in February.

Mr Mundy this week said those efforts had been positive,

“Some people in Ballarat have already been successful in securing roles in other areas of Telstra. The team has also been given the opportunity to apply for an additional 52 roles in other areas of Telstra,” he said.

“The recruitment process for the 18 new roles as part of the restructure is still underway. These roles are only open to people within the affected team.

“Paperwork for the redundancy process was handed out last Wednesday, March 4. People who are either unsuccessful, or are not interested, in securing another role will exit the business on April 14.”

Mr Mundy said a number of the consultancy staff had already secured further work in the business and had been redeployed to other areas.

[email protected]南京夜网.au

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Toddler dies after fatal Bedfordale crash

A two-year-old girl who was critically injured in a head-on crash on Friday has died.
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Major Crash Investigators are seeking the public’s assistance with their investigation into the crash in which a 60-year-old woman, believed to be an American tourist, also died.

The crash happened on Albany Highway in Bedfordale on Friday morning, at about 10:45am, when a white Nissan Pulsar sedan and a silver Mitsubishi Magna sedan were involved in a head on collision.

The 60-year-old woman was a passenger in the Nissan Pulsar sedan.

The driver of the Nissan Pulsar, a 61-year-old man, and a 21-year-old woman, were both seriously injured and taken to Royal Perth Hospital for treatment.

The driver of the Mitsubishi Magna, a 27-year-old man, and the passengers  – a 28-year-old woman, a 50-year-old man and the two-year-old girl, all from Katanning, were seriously injured.

All three adults were taken to Royal Perth Hospital.

The girl was taken to Princess Margaret Hospital, but died on Saturday morning.

Police would like to speak to anyone who was travelling in the area at the time who saw the crash or saw the vehicles prior to the crash.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.  Follow WAtoday on Twitter

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First lady in Kyoto

US first lady Michelle Obama performs Taiko with the Akutagawa High School Taiko Club during her visit to Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, in western Japan, Friday, March 20, 2015. Taiko are a a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments, and have a mythological origin in Japanese folklore. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) Photo: Koji Sasahara U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (C) beats a Japanese traditional taiko drum with members from Akutagawa High School Taiko Club in front of the main gate, as she visits Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan March 20, 2015. Michelle Obama flew in to Japan on Wednesday for a three-day visit as part of the Let Girls Learn international girls education initiative. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Photo: ISSEI KATO
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US first lady Michelle Obama performs Taiko with the Akutagawa High School Taiko Club during her visit to Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, in western Japan, Friday, March 20, 2015. Taiko are a a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments, and have a mythological origin in Japanese folklore. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) Photo: Koji Sasahara

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (C) beats a Japanese traditional taiko drum with members from Akutagawa High School Taiko Club in front of the main gate, as she visits Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan March 20, 2015. Michelle Obama flew in to Japan on Wednesday for a three-day visit as part of the Let Girls Learn international girls education initiative. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Photo: ISSEI KATO

US first lady Michelle Obama performs Taiko with the Akutagawa High School Taiko Club during her visit to Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, in western Japan, Friday, March 20, 2015. Taiko are a a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments, and have a mythological origin in Japanese folklore. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) Photo: Koji Sasahara

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (C) beats a Japanese traditional taiko drum with members from Akutagawa High School Taiko Club in front of the main gate, as she visits Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan March 20, 2015. Michelle Obama flew in to Japan on Wednesday for a three-day visit as part of the Let Girls Learn international girls education initiative. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Photo: ISSEI KATO

US first lady Michelle Obama performs Taiko with the Akutagawa High School Taiko Club during her visit to Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, in western Japan, Friday, March 20, 2015. Taiko are a a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments, and have a mythological origin in Japanese folklore. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) Photo: Koji Sasahara

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (C) beats a Japanese traditional taiko drum with members from Akutagawa High School Taiko Club in front of the main gate, as she visits Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan March 20, 2015. Michelle Obama flew in to Japan on Wednesday for a three-day visit as part of the Let Girls Learn international girls education initiative. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Photo: ISSEI KATO

US first lady Michelle Obama, centre, beats a Japanese traditional taiko drum with members of the Akutagawa High School Taiko Club in front of the main gate, as she visits Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine in Kyoto. Mrs Obama flew to Japan on Wednesday for a three-day visit as part of the Let Girls Learn international girls education initiative. (Reuters)

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Former Catholic brother charged with child sex offences at St Joseph’s and St Gregory’s colleges

St Joseph’s College in Hunter’s Hill, where a boy was allegedly assaulted in 1987. Photo: James BrickwoodA former Catholic brother has been arrested over a number of sex offences allegedly committed against boys at two Sydney schools in the 1980s.
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The 52-year-old man was charged on Friday after a police investigation into allegations he sexually assaulted boys at St Joseph’s College in Hunters Hill in 1987 and St Gregory’s College in Campbelltown in 1989.

The two students were aged 12 at the time of the alleged sexual assaults.

Both matters were reported to the police in late 2014, with the investigation run by the Campbelltown Local Area Command.

The former brother, who was working at the Marist Brothers schools when the alleged assaults occurred, was arrested at Tweed Heads Police Station on Friday afternoon.

He was charged with four counts of sexual assault (indecent assault under 16 under authority) and six counts of sexual assault (sexual intercourse under 16 under authority).

The arrest came on the same day as a former dorm master from St Joseph’s was jailed for sexually assaulting a student after nine separate trials spanning 13 years, and more than 30 years after the abuse took place.

John Dennis Maguire, 71, who worked at the school between 1978 to 1986, was sentenced to a minimum sentence of one year and nine months jail for six separate assaults on an 11-year-old boy in 1983 while he was employed as the boy’s dorm master. Maguire had previously faced court over sexual assault charges but was acquitted seven times.

The former principal of St Gregory’s, Peter Pemble, who stepped down due to ill health in 2008, pleaded guilty to an indecent assault charge last year.

Allegations of child sexual abuse in Marist Brothers schools in the ACT, NSW and Queensland were the subject of an inquiry by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse last year.

The commission heard that the Catholic order’s Sydney province received 128 complaints about child sexual abuse in the decade to 2012, according to evidence before the commission. The order has been the subject of more sexual abuse complaints than any in Australia except the Christian Brothers.

The former brother, whose name has not been released, was granted conditional bail to appear at Tweed Heads Local Court on April 13.

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For whom should strata building residents vote at the 2015 state election?

With the NSW election looming, we thought we would take a look at what the various parties have planned for strata residents.
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First, there’s a new Strata Party, although officially it’s just a group. You have to register a political party a year before a vote, so there will be just the letter H on the Senate ballot paper, indicating the group that wishes it could be known as the Strata Party.

I guess the Strata Party’s policies will be pro-apartment resident, but by the time you read this, it will apparently have a website running at strataparty.org.au.

In further non-party news, Sydney’s incumbent MP, Independent Alex Greenwich has told Flat Chat that if he is re-elected, he will promote a bill to deal with overcrowding and illegal short-term lets. Greenwich’s Sydney seat contains the largest concentration of apartment buildings in the state, so good luck to him.

The government’s policy on both, of leaving it to the local councils, has been spectacularly inadequate. Actually, that sums up the government’s performance on strata generally, with strata law reforms delayed for years, but pro-developer restrictions on defect claims pushed through at warp speed. The issues on the Liberal Party’s website (nsw.liberal.org.au) don’t mention strata or apartments, so judge for yourself.

So far Labor’s take on proposed strata law reforms is that they are against the proposals to allow 75 per cent of owners in old strata blocks to force the others to sell their homes for redevelopment. However, its policy documents (act.nswlabor.org.au/policy) say nothing about apartments, while the cover of its housing policy pamphlet is a picture of McMansions. H’m.

The Greens’ website (nsw.greens.org.au) doesn’t say anything about strata directly, but the Greens do want to keep rents down and give tenants more rights, and more than half of strata residents are tenants. However, if you dig deep enough, you will find that they, too, are against illegal short-term letting.

So is this H Bloc, Strata (non-)Party, a good idea? Who would you prefer to hold the balance of power in the Senate: strata residents, religious extremists or people who kill animals for fun?

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New homes with architectural flair are winning over Sydney buyers

Artist’s impression of Connor, the latest apartment building at Central Park, Chippendale. Photo: domain南京夜网.au
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Artist’s impression of Sugarcube Apartments and Honeycomb Terraces, Erskineville. Photo: domain南京夜网.au

Artist’s impression of Connor, the latest apartment building at Central Park, Chippendale. Photo: domain南京夜网.au

Artist’s impression of Sugarcube Apartments and Honeycomb Terraces, Erskineville. Photo: domain南京夜网.au

Artist’s impression of Sugarcube Apartments and Honeycomb Terraces, Erskineville. Photo: domain南京夜网.au

Artist’s impression of Connor, the latest apartment building at Central Park, Chippendale. Photo: domain南京夜网.au

Artist’s impression of Sugarcube Apartments and Honeycomb Terraces, Erskineville. Photo: domain南京夜网.au

Tall, minimalist glass towers have their place in the housing of Sydney’s residents but some apartment buyers are looking for edgier, artier buildings to call home.

Developers recognising this trend are engaging architects to imbue a sense of the extraordinary into the designs of some new apartment buildings and their interiors.

On a former industrial site three kilometres south-west of the city at Erskineville, 109 apartments and 18 terrace-style homes are planned for completion in early 2017.

The complex of apartments will be instantly recognisable with its unique street appearance.

Developer, Golden Rain, sought the imagination and design know-how of award-winning dKO Architecture. Responsible for many of Melbourne’s most intriguing recent, dKO Architecture made a big impact on the Sydney apartment market last year when their plans for Eve at Erskineville were unveiled. Within two hours of release, 140 apartments had sold off the plan.

Named for their unusual appearance, Sugarcube Apartments and Honeycomb Terraces are an architectural delight. The project offers a mix of homes from studios to three-bedroom Torrens title terraces.

Ian Bennet, director of residential at Colliers International, said Sugarcube Apartments and Honeycomb Terraces will feature striking exteriors which will carry through to “stunning, light-filled open-plan homes.”

The top-floor apartments of Sugarcube are configured as lofts and following a trend in Sydney, a rooftop garden with city views, sun lounges, bench seating, a barbecue and dining space will be included to be shared by residents.

The 18 Torrens title terraces will each have their own street entry. Designed over three levels, the three-bedroom terraces are oriented to the north and have off-street parking.

Erskineville village and the train station are a level walk. “Erskineville has such a great village vibe despite being so centrally located,” says Bennett. “We are expecting strong interest from young professionals and investors.”

With a hard act to follow the world-class standard of architecture at the now landmark One Central Park buildings in Chippendale, William Smart of Smart Design Studio applied his skill and imagination to allow the newest and smallest building in Central Park, Connor, to stand on its own merit.

“What attracted us to working with Frasers Property Group,” says Smart, “was their commitment to creativity.”

From Smart Design Studio’s previous work in the interiors of One Central Park, Smart knew buyers appreciated fine design … with a twist. He has dressed the 12-storey Connor with luminous copper-coloured fins and added a sculptural appearance to the southern facade.

A three-storey, all-white void in the lobby of Connor will create an art experience for residents and visitors. A back-lit membrane will act like a light box programmed with changeable coloured LED lighting. “It will be like stepping into the future,” says Smart Design Studio’s Victoria Judge, who heads up the interiors division.

“It is critical for us to focus on the architecture of the exterior and interior as one,”  Smart says.

Positioned on the south-west corner of Chippendale Green, Connor’s apartments will have views of the extraordinary heliostat, the heritage Brewery Yard, Chippendale Green and west to Sydney University.

Not far away at Lewisham, the design for Meriton’s new development Luna, is a step away from the norm. PTW Architects have designed an intriguing mix of heights and shapes for the complex of seven buildings.

Curved walls and saw-tooth rooflines are incorporated into the design of 298 apartments positioned within walking distance of the light rail and train stations.

Luna will include an indoor aquatic centre with a lap pool, spa and sauna, as well as a gym, landscaped gardens and a 3400-square-metre park.

Sugarcube & Honeycomb

Corner Metters and Pearl streets, Erskineville

dKO Architecture continues its reputation for imaginative design with their plans for these apartments and Torrens title terraces. Architectural angles, curves and rooftop gardens with city views set this quirky development apart. Sugarcube Apartments has a mix of studios, one- and two-bedroom units (41-93 square metres) from $550,000. The 18 Torrens title Honeycomb Terraces all have three bedrooms and individual street entries. Prices still to be set. Due for completion early 2017. Display suite open from March 28. Phone Colliers International, 1800 990 196. sugarcubehoneycomb南京夜网.au

Case study

Artist Peter Francis Lawrence moved to Central Park from Potts Point in search of a change. “Potts Point had lost its joie de vivre,” says Lawrence. “Chippendale has a buzz and excitement with lots of galleries and artists in the area and so many places to eat.”

After enjoying life in the Central Park East tower designed by Jean Nouvel, Lawrence bought a two-bedroom apartment in Connor. “The architecture is wonderful. I think some of the best of Sydney’s architecture is in Central Park,” says Lawrence. “We had seen a smidgen of William Smart’s architecture and knew he designed the White Gallery so we had a lot of confidence.”

Or try these:

Connor, 8 Central Park Avenue, Chippendale

Connor is set to join Central Park’s earlier architecturally stunning residential buildings. Designed by Smart Design Studio, the facade of the 12-storey building is dressed in luminous, copper-coloured blades. More than half the 178 apartments have now sold. Still available are a range of studios (50-59 square metres) from $620,000, one-beds (47-93 square metres) $696,000, two-beds (67-132 square metres) from $1.09 million and three-beds (83-131 square metres) from $1.44 million. Strata levies from $1200 pq. Phone 1300 857 057. centralparksydney南京夜网

Luna, 78-90 Old Canterbury Road, Lewisham

Designed by PTW architects, Luna’s 298 apartments are divided between seven highly individual buildings ranging from four to 10 storeys. Angled balconies, curved walls and raised rooflines step away from homogenous apartment design. Construction of the complex started in January. Available are a mix of studios, one-bedroom units, some with studies, two- and three-bedroom apartments. Prices and strata levies are yet to be released. Due for completion early 2016. Phone Meriton, 0412 488 270. meriton南京夜网.au

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120 University of Tasmania academics sign letter berating Liberal Whip Andrew Nikolic for attack on free speech

Liberal MP Andrew Nikolic Photo: Alex EllinghausenMore than 100 lecturers and academics at the University of Tasmania have accused Liberal Whip Andrew Nikolic of “abusing his parliamentary role” by attempting to prevent a senior lecturer from criticising the Abbott government.
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Mr Nikolic contacted university vice-chancellor Peter Rathjen to query whether Dr Michael Powell, a lecturer in history and politics, had broken any employment rules by submitting a fiery letter to the editor of the Launceston Examinerin which he lashed the government for cutting funding to the university.

Mr Nikolic, a former Brigadier in the Australian Army who was promoted to the position of whip by Prime Minister Tony Abbott last month, has insisted he was not attempting to “stifle the free speech” of Dr Powell but was simply asking whether his views represented the university’s position.

University staff reacted with fury after Fairfax Mediadetailed the brawl on Mondayand revealed Professor Rathjen had deemed that Dr Powell was not representing the views of the university and had declined to defend his staff member publicly.

By 4pm on Wednesday, 119 university staff had signed an open letter of protest.

“We, the undersigned, believe it is Mr Nikolic’s obligation as a parliamentarian to uphold the principle of free expression. Mr Nikolic using his privileged position to attempt to prevent Dr Powell from commenting is, we believe, an abuse of his parliamentary role,” they wrote.

“Any parliamentarian should listen to their constituents, not ‘shoot the messenger’.

“Mr Nikolic’s action also represents an attack on the long-standing principle of academic freedom. Academic staff are NOT public servants and have a right to engage in public controversy within their area of professional expertise without fear or favour.

“We the undersigned write on our own behalf to express our profound concern with Mr Nikolic’s actions, and ask if he intends to email the vice-chancellor to express his displeasure about us as well?”

Dr John Kenny, a science lecturer, who organised the open letter, said Mr Nikolic appeared to be using army methods to crack down on dissent among constituents.

“The staff who have contacted me are outraged. They take the principle of academic freedom very seriously. Mr Nikolic needs to understand this is not the army; he cannot use his authority to force compliance with his views,” he told Fairfax Media.

A media spokesman for Mr Nikolic said he was too busy to talk before hanging up.

On Monday, Mr Nikolic dismissed Dr Powell’s criticism as politically-motivated, describing him as a “failed Labor candidate” who was undertaking a “anti-Liberal letter writing campaign”. Dr Powell stood as a state Labor candidate in Tasmania three decades ago.

The signatories of the letter have also called on Professor Rathjen and the academic senate to “endorse the principle of academic freedom”.

In a statement, Prof Rathjen said:”The University of Tasmania is deeply committed to the principle of academic freedom, as articulated in policies agreed by Academic Senate, and the belief that in their areas of expertise our academics have much that is special to contribute to discussions about the life and possible futures of our communities.”

It is not the first time that Mr Nikolic has drawn criticism for drawing links between political expression and someone’s employment.

In 2012, as the Liberal candidate for the seat of Bass, he was accused of online bullying when he threatened to contact the employers of 13 people who “liked” a satirical story about him posted on Facebook.

He wrote to all 13 people who clicked the “like” button after reading the story but did not go through with his threat to contact their employers. He later complained that the anonymous author of the article was also standing against him for election.

Mr Nikolic’s vigorous approach to criticism was raised in Parliament in a recent speech by Tasmanian Labor senator Helen Polley, who accused him of having a “glass jaw” and “tittle-tattling” to Professor Rathjen.

“He is obsessed with anyone in our community that challenges his view and expresses a different view about this unfair budget that they brought down. He has been unrelenting in his personal attacks and putting pressure on people who dare to critique this budget,” Senator Polley said in a speech on February 22.

The story120 University of Tasmania academics sign letter berating Liberal Whip Andrew Nikolic for attack on free speechfirst appeared onThe Sydney Morning Herald.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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